In 1946, aspiring attorney Ada Lois Sipuel (1924 - 1995) made a game changing decision to put her plans to attend law school on hold to challenge segregation in public education. After being denied admission to attend the University of Oklahoma’s law school on the basis of race, rather than attend a private law school open to black students, Sipuel petitioned the District Court of Cleveland County, Oklahoma. Her writ was refused. When the Oklahoma Supreme Court upheld the lower court’s decision, the petitioners (including then attorney Thurgood Marshall) appealed to the Supreme Court. 
On January 12, 1948, the Supreme Court ruled in Sipuel v. Board of Regents of University of Oklahoma that the state of Oklahoma was required to provide equal instruction to black students. Sipuel was admitted to the University of Oklahoma School of law in 1949.
Photo courtesy of The University of Oklahoma College of Law

In 1946, aspiring attorney Ada Lois Sipuel (1924 - 1995) made a game changing decision to put her plans to attend law school on hold to challenge segregation in public education. After being denied admission to attend the University of Oklahoma’s law school on the basis of race, rather than attend a private law school open to black students, Sipuel petitioned the District Court of Cleveland County, Oklahoma. Her writ was refused. When the Oklahoma Supreme Court upheld the lower court’s decision, the petitioners (including then attorney Thurgood Marshall) appealed to the Supreme Court. 

On January 12, 1948, the Supreme Court ruled in Sipuel v. Board of Regents of University of Oklahoma that the state of Oklahoma was required to provide equal instruction to black students. Sipuel was admitted to the University of Oklahoma School of law in 1949.

Photo courtesy of The University of Oklahoma College of Law