Two women, somewhere in Virginia, 1910s
National Photo Company collection, Library of Congress

Two women, somewhere in Virginia, 1910s

National Photo Company collection, Library of Congress



Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the life and work of African-American chemist Percy Julian, an award-winning scientist who held over 100 chemical patents. PBS NOVA aired an excellent documentary about Julian called Forgotten Genius. You can read more about him and view the film here.



"Isaac & Rosa, Slave Children from New Orleans."
Kimball, photographer (Broadway, NY), 1863
Gladstone Collection of African American Photographs, Library of Congress

"Isaac & Rosa, Slave Children from New Orleans."

Kimball, photographer (Broadway, NY), 1863

Gladstone Collection of African American Photographs, Library of Congress



On April 9, 1866, the United States House of Representatives overrode President Andrew Johnson’s veto to enact the Civil Rights Bill of 1866. The legislation— entitled An Act to protect all Persons in the United States in their Civil Rights and liberties, and furnish the Means of their Vindication— conferred citizenship on African-Americans and gave black men “the same right, in every State and Territory… as is enjoyed by white citizens.”
Image: “The first vote”, by Alfred R. Waud, November 16, 1867. Illustration from Harper’s Weekly, v. 11, no. 568. Source: Library of Congress

On April 9, 1866, the United States House of Representatives overrode President Andrew Johnson’s veto to enact the Civil Rights Bill of 1866. The legislation— entitled An Act to protect all Persons in the United States in their Civil Rights and liberties, and furnish the Means of their Vindication— conferred citizenship on African-Americans and gave black men “the same right, in every State and Territory… as is enjoyed by white citizens.”

Image: “The first vote”, by Alfred R. Waud, November 16, 1867. Illustration from Harper’s Weekly, v. 11, no. 568. Source: Library of Congress



pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 7, 1994: Rwanda Civil War [and genocide] Begins
Twenty years ago today, Hutu gunmen systematically start tracking down and killing moderate Hutu politicians and Tutsi leaders. The deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda tells Washington that the killings involve not just political murders, but genocide.
Thousands die on the first day, setting off 100 days of slaughter.
Follow FRONTLINE’s Rwandan Genocide timeline to learn about significant events, statements and decisions that reveal how the United States and the West chose not to act to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
Photo: A woman consoles Bizimana Emmanuel, 22, during the 20th anniversary commemoration of the 1994 genocide at Amahoro Stadium April 7, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 7, 1994: Rwanda Civil War [and genocide] Begins

Twenty years ago today, Hutu gunmen systematically start tracking down and killing moderate Hutu politicians and Tutsi leaders. The deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda tells Washington that the killings involve not just political murders, but genocide.

Thousands die on the first day, setting off 100 days of slaughter.

Follow FRONTLINE’s Rwandan Genocide timeline to learn about significant events, statements and decisions that reveal how the United States and the West chose not to act to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.

Photo: A woman consoles Bizimana Emmanuel, 22, during the 20th anniversary commemoration of the 1994 genocide at Amahoro Stadium April 7, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Tags: history Rwanda







The Lees on their wedding day in Tallahassee, Florida
December 1954
The Tallahassee Democrat Collection, State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/259866

The Lees on their wedding day in Tallahassee, Florida

December 1954

The Tallahassee Democrat Collection, State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/259866



zuky:

leseanthomas:

George Crum (born George Speck (c. 1828 – July 22, 1914) was a mixed-race Native American trapper and guide in the Adirondacks, who became renowned for his culinary skills after becoming a cook and restaurant owner in Saratoga Springs, New York. By 1860 he owned Crum’s House, a popular lakeside restaurant in nearby Malta.

Every time a person crunches into a potato chip, he or she is enjoying the delicious taste of one of the world’s most famous snacks – a treat that might not exist without the contribution of inventor George Crum.The son of an African-American father and a Native American mother, Crum was working as the chef in the summer of 1853 when he incidentally invented the chip. It all began when a patron who ordered a plate of French-fried potatoes sent them back to Crum’s kitchen because he felt they were too thick and soft.To teach the picky patron a lesson, Crum sliced a new batch of potatoes as thin as he possibly could, and then fried them until they were hard and crunchy. Finally, to top them off, he added a generous heaping of salt. To Crum’s surprise, the dish ended up being a hit with the patron and a new snack was born.Years later, Crum opened his own restaurant that had a basket of potato chips on every table. Though Crum never attempted to patent his invention, the snack was eventually mass-produced and sold in bags – providing thousands of jobs nationwide.
Read about George Crum: http://www.amazon.com/George-Crum-Saratoga-Gaylia-Taylor/dp/1600606563

Mountain trapper and innovative cook, my kind of guy. Thank you, George Crum, for the beauty of the potato chip.

Wow, who knew?

zuky:

leseanthomas:

George Crum (born George Speck (c. 1828 – July 22, 1914) was a mixed-race Native American trapper and guide in the Adirondacks, who became renowned for his culinary skills after becoming a cook and restaurant owner in Saratoga Springs, New York. By 1860 he owned Crum’s House, a popular lakeside restaurant in nearby Malta.

Every time a person crunches into a potato chip, he or she is enjoying the delicious taste of one of the world’s most famous snacks – a treat that might not exist without the contribution of inventor George Crum.

The son of an African-American father and a Native American mother, Crum was working as the chef in the summer of 1853 when he incidentally invented the chip. It all began when a patron who ordered a plate of French-fried potatoes sent them back to Crum’s kitchen because he felt they were too thick and soft.

To teach the picky patron a lesson, Crum sliced a new batch of potatoes as thin as he possibly could, and then fried them until they were hard and crunchy. Finally, to top them off, he added a generous heaping of salt. To Crum’s surprise, the dish ended up being a hit with the patron and a new snack was born.

Years later, Crum opened his own restaurant that had a basket of potato chips on every table. Though Crum never attempted to patent his invention, the snack was eventually mass-produced and sold in bags – providing thousands of jobs nationwide.

Read about George Crum: http://www.amazon.com/George-Crum-Saratoga-Gaylia-Taylor/dp/1600606563

Mountain trapper and innovative cook, my kind of guy. Thank you, George Crum, for the beauty of the potato chip.

Wow, who knew?



The Historian Who Unearthed ‘Twelve Years a Slave’: The New Yorker


Unidentified man and woman, ca. 1900
Image courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Unidentified man and woman, ca. 1900

Image courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History



heytoyourmamanem:

This is the Cabinet Bed, a bed that when folded up functioned as a roll-top desk, complete with compartments for stationery and pens. The bed was patented by Sarah Goode, a Chicago furniture store owner. She wanted to create a bed that would help people maximize limited space. Goode received her patent on July 14, 1885. She was the first black woman to receive a US patent.




Pilot Bessie Coleman, 1923
Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection
Texas native Bessie Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license.
When gender and racial barriers prevented Coleman from studying in the United States, she traveled to France, where she obtained an international aviation license from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale. She later earned a living by performing in airshows as a stunt pilot.
Coleman was killed when her plane malfunctioned. Her Jacksonville, Florida funeral was attended by 5,000 mourners.


Pilot Bessie Coleman, 1923

Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection

Texas native Bessie Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license.

When gender and racial barriers prevented Coleman from studying in the United States, she traveled to France, where she obtained an international aviation license from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale. She later earned a living by performing in airshows as a stunt pilot.

Coleman was killed when her plane malfunctioned. Her Jacksonville, Florida funeral was attended by 5,000 mourners.

(Source: heytoyourmamanem)



swanngalleries:

Keep Us Flying! / Buy War Bonds 1943
One of very few World War II posters to show or promote Black Americans, this poster features a representation of one of the now-famous Tuskegee Airmen. 
A sneak peek from Vintage Posters, Aug. 1, 2012. 

swanngalleries:

Keep Us Flying! / Buy War Bonds 1943

One of very few World War II posters to show or promote Black Americans, this poster features a representation of one of the now-famous Tuskegee Airmen. 

A sneak peek from Vintage Posters, Aug. 1, 2012. 

(Source: catalogue.swanngalleries.com, via tballardbrown)



1900 advertisement for Shaw University
Shaw was founded in 1865 in Raleigh, NC. It is the oldest HBCU in the South.
Image Source: Library of Congress, Chronicling America, National Digital Newspaper Program

1900 advertisement for Shaw University

Shaw was founded in 1865 in Raleigh, NC. It is the oldest HBCU in the South.

Image Source: Library of Congress, Chronicling America, National Digital Newspaper Program