American Federation of Teachers Strike, Inkster, Michigan, 1973
Photographer unknown
American Federation of Teachers Collection, Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State Universitiy

American Federation of Teachers Strike, Inkster, Michigan, 1973

Photographer unknown

American Federation of Teachers Collection, Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State Universitiy

(Source: heytoyourmamanem)



Women near Earle, Arkansas, July 1936
Dorothea Lange, photographer
OWI/FSA Collection, Library of Congress

Women near Earle, Arkansas, July 1936

Dorothea Lange, photographer

OWI/FSA Collection, Library of Congress

(Source: heytoyourmamanem)



Field worker. Holtville, Imperial Valley, California. He had just made himself shoes out of that old tire. June 1935.
Dorothea Lange, photographer
Library of Congress

Field worker. Holtville, Imperial Valley, California. He had just made himself shoes out of that old tire. June 1935.

Dorothea Lange, photographer

Library of Congress

(Source: loc.gov)



Lunchtime for Musella, Georgia  peach pickers. July 1936.
Dorothea Lange, photographer
Library of Congress

Lunchtime for Musella, Georgia  peach pickers. July 1936.

Dorothea Lange, photographer

Library of Congress

(Source: loc.gov)



African American Bricklayers Union, Jacksonville, Florida, ca. 1899
Library of Congress

African American Bricklayers Union, Jacksonville, Florida, ca. 1899

Library of Congress

(Source: heytoyourmamanem)



mightyflynn:

March 1943
New River, North Carolina
Original caption:
Negro Marines prepare for action. Breaking a tradition of 167 years, the U.S. Marine Corps started enlisting Negroes on June 1, 1942. The first class of 1,200 Negro volunteers began their training three months later as members of the 51st Composite Defense Battalion at Montford Point, a section of the 200 square mile Marine Base, Camp Lejeune, at New River, North Carolina. Evidence of the lack of racial friction may be seen in the sports program at the camp. On the baseball team Negro enlistees and white non-com officers are teammates. Camp Lejeune has its own baseball league, with the Montford Point team a strong contender for championship honors
Photo by Roger Smith
Library of Congress via Yale

mightyflynn:

March 1943

New River, North Carolina

Original caption:

Negro Marines prepare for action. Breaking a tradition of 167 years, the U.S. Marine Corps started enlisting Negroes on June 1, 1942. The first class of 1,200 Negro volunteers began their training three months later as members of the 51st Composite Defense Battalion at Montford Point, a section of the 200 square mile Marine Base, Camp Lejeune, at New River, North Carolina. Evidence of the lack of racial friction may be seen in the sports program at the camp. On the baseball team Negro enlistees and white non-com officers are teammates. Camp Lejeune has its own baseball league, with the Montford Point team a strong contender for championship honors

Photo by Roger Smith

Library of Congress via Yale



schomburgcenter:

On this day, August 24, 1950, Edith Sampson, pictured on the right with Eleanor Roosevelt on the left, was named the first black delegate to the United Nations. Sampson held this position for three years. Sampson’s first degree was in social work and then she went to John Marshall for Law School, graduating with a dean’s commendation. She received her master of law degree from Loyola University and became one of the first African American women to join the Chicago chapter of the National Association of Women Lawyers and to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court. Sampson later became a judge elected to a Municipal Court.

schomburgcenter:

On this day, August 24, 1950, Edith Sampson, pictured on the right with Eleanor Roosevelt on the left, was named the first black delegate to the United Nations. Sampson held this position for three years. Sampson’s first degree was in social work and then she went to John Marshall for Law School, graduating with a dean’s commendation. She received her master of law degree from Loyola University and became one of the first African American women to join the Chicago chapter of the National Association of Women Lawyers and to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court. Sampson later became a judge elected to a Municipal Court.



“Whose little boy are you?” ― James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time

Photo: “The young colored American”, from The Colored American magazine, October 1900. Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University

“Whose little boy are you?” ― James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time

Photo: “The young colored American”, from The Colored American magazine, October 1900. Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University





engineeringhistory:

Lewis Latimer, 1882. Latimer was a son of a former slave, born in 1848. In 1863 he lied about his age so that he could enlist in Union Navy during the Civil War. After the war, he moved to Boston where he learned drafting, and one of his assignments was to draw the technical figures for Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone patents. In 1885 he was hired by Thomas Edison, and received several patents for improvements in electrical lighting and refrigeration systems. In 1918 he was named an Edison Pioneer, the only African American who was bestowed with that honor.

engineeringhistory:

Lewis Latimer, 1882. Latimer was a son of a former slave, born in 1848. In 1863 he lied about his age so that he could enlist in Union Navy during the Civil War. After the war, he moved to Boston where he learned drafting, and one of his assignments was to draw the technical figures for Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone patents. In 1885 he was hired by Thomas Edison, and received several patents for improvements in electrical lighting and refrigeration systems. In 1918 he was named an Edison Pioneer, the only African American who was bestowed with that honor.



"Freedom is people realizing they are their own leader."

— Diane Nash



 

Young woman being carried to police patrol wagon during a demonstration in Brooklyn, New York, 1963
 World Telegram & Sun photo by Dick DeMarsico.
New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection, Library of Congress

 

Young woman being carried to police patrol wagon during a demonstration in Brooklyn, New York, 1963

World Telegram & Sun photo by Dick DeMarsico.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection, Library of Congress



"An invented past can never be used; it cracks and crumbles under the pressures of life like clay in a season of drought."

— James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time



As the Great War Centenary commemoration begins, here’s a project that aims to ensure Africa’s involvement is no longer forgotten or ignored.

Photo: Senegalese Troops. Illustration from Scott’s Official History of the American Negro in the World War, by Emmett J. Scott, Arno Press, 1919. Courtesty Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University.

Kenya is one of the countries that will be hosting Centenary events. For details, go to the 100 Taita Taveta website.

Tags: history WW1 1910s



pbsamericanmasters:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 11, 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop
On this day in 1973, DJ Kool Herc dropped a new sound that changed history. While DJ’ing at his sister’s back-to-school party, Herc tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (scratching the track) to let people dance longer (break dancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. And so DJ Kool Herc set hip-hop on its dynamic evolution towards the expressive art form it is today.
Take an intimate look at the innovation, excitement and collective spirit that characterizes the early beginnings of hip-hop and its influence today.
Photo: Bigtimepeace: DJ Kool Herc spins records in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx at an event addressing “The West Indian Roots of Hip-Hop,” February 28, 2009. (Wikimedia Commons)

A great day for music! 

pbsamericanmasters:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 11, 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop

On this day in 1973, DJ Kool Herc dropped a new sound that changed history. While DJ’ing at his sister’s back-to-school party, Herc tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (scratching the track) to let people dance longer (break dancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. And so DJ Kool Herc set hip-hop on its dynamic evolution towards the expressive art form it is today.

Take an intimate look at the innovation, excitement and collective spirit that characterizes the early beginnings of hip-hop and its influence today.

Photo: Bigtimepeace: DJ Kool Herc spins records in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx at an event addressing “The West Indian Roots of Hip-Hop,” February 28, 2009. (Wikimedia Commons)

A great day for music!