This is fascinating.



Lithograph: Family record depicting African American family life before the Civil War and since the war.
Krebs Lithographing Company, Cincinnati, ca. 1880
Library of Congress

Lithograph: Family record depicting African American family life before the Civil War and since the war.

Krebs Lithographing Company, Cincinnati, ca. 1880

Library of Congress



blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

RIP, Alice Coachman, First Black Woman to Win an Olympic Gold Medal

(November 9, 1923-July 14, 2014)

Books:

Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman Olympic High Jump Champion

Heather Lang

At the 1948 Olympics in London, members of the U.S. Women’s Track and Field team went down to defeat one by one. Any hope of winning rested on Alice Coachman. Thousands of spectators stayed late for the high-jump event and witnessed history as she became the first African American woman to win an Olympic gold medal. In time for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, this book follows Coachman on her journey from rural Georgia, where she overcame adversity both as a woman and as a black athlete, to her triumph in Wembly Stadium.

Touch the Sky: Alice Coachman, Olympic High Jumper

Ann Malaspina

A biography of the first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal, from her childhood in segregated Albany, Georgia, in the 1930s, through her recognition at the 1996 Olympics as one of the hundred best athletes in Olympic history.







NPR has assembled a fantastic resource on the Civil Rights Act, which was enacted on July 2, 1964. Great information and photographs documenting this historic event.



Woman riding a float in the annual Bud Billiken Day Parade in Chicago, Illinois (August 1973). The Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic is the oldest and largest African American parade in the U.S. Founded in 1929 by Chicago Defender editor Robert Sengstacke, the parade’s original purpose was to give underprivileged youth a day in the limelight. The event is held every August on Chicago’s South Side.
This photograph was taken by John H. White, as part of the EPA’s Documerica project.
Source: the U.S. National Archives

Woman riding a float in the annual Bud Billiken Day Parade in Chicago, Illinois (August 1973). The Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic is the oldest and largest African American parade in the U.S. Founded in 1929 by Chicago Defender editor Robert Sengstacke, the parade’s original purpose was to give underprivileged youth a day in the limelight. The event is held every August on Chicago’s South Side.

This photograph was taken by John H. White, as part of the EPA’s Documerica project.

Source: the U.S. National Archives

(Source: Flickr / usnationalarchives)





Fannie Lou Hamer’s testimony before the Credentials Committee, Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey - August 22, 1964

via American Experience

(Source: youtube.com)



Rita Schwerner, a Freedom Summer volunteer, is the widow of slain civil rights worker Michael Schwerner (November 6, 1939 – June 21, 1964).



Bayard Rustin and Dr. Eugene Reed at Freedom House
World Telegram & Sun photo by Al Ravenna, 1964
Library of Congress

Bayard Rustin and Dr. Eugene Reed at Freedom House

World Telegram & Sun photo by Al Ravenna, 1964

Library of Congress



This month marks 50 years since the beginning of the Freedom Summer movement in Mississippi. A film documenting the courageous campaign to secure voting rights and end stifling oppression in the state premiers tonight on PBS.



Founded by homesteader Francis Marion Boyer, the town of Blackdom was New Mexico’s first community of African Americans.

via Colores, New Mexico PBS

(Source: youtube.com)



 

Chapel Hill native Elizabeth “Libba” Cotten (January 5, 1895 – June 29, 1987) was a self-taught blues and folk musician, singer, and songwriter. She is best known for her timeless song “Freight Train”. Ms. Cotten was declared a National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts and was later recognized by the Smithsonian Institution as a “living treasure.” She received a Grammy Award in 1985 when she was ninety, almost eighty years after she first began composing music.

Video: ”Washington Blues” and “I’m Going Away” by Elizabeth Cotten (1965) (by humbatron)



blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Elizabeth’s Song

 

Michael Wenberg

 

Elizabeth’s Song tells the inspirational story based on the young life of the noted African American folksinger, guitarist, and songwriter, Elizabeth Cotten. Elizabeth borrows a guitar from a friend and teaches herself to play it left-handed. Eventually, Elizabeth earns enough money to buy a guitar of her own and, when only eleven years old, writes her first song. That song, “Freight Train,” has become a folk music classic. Elizabeth’s unique style of playing guitar (upside down and backwards), from which the term cotton-picking is derived, has inspired countless other artists.