thecivilwarparlor:

African American Nurses During The Civil War
During the Civil War, black women’s services included nursing or domestic chores in medical settings, laundering and cooking for the soldiers. As the Union Army marched through the South and large numbers of freed black men enlisted, their female family members often obtained employment with the unit. The Union Army paid black women to raise cotton on plantations for the northern government to sell.
Five black nurses served under the direction of Catholic nuns aboard the Navy hospital ship Red Rover. Four of their names—Alice Kennedy, Sarah Kinno, Ellen Campbell and Betsy Young—have been recorded. Black nurses are in the record books of both Union and Confederate hospitals. As many as 181 black nurses—both female and male—served in convalescent and US government hospitals in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina during the war.
Photo: Sixth-plate ambrotype of a Black woman in a white dress, with gilt accents to her earrings, necklace and rings. Solarization at margins only compromises image somewhat and the woman is still quite visible and distinct. Velvet lining rubbed, some dents to brass mat and gutta-percha case.  This image is from Railsplitter http://www.railsplitter.com/sale11/blackam.html
Source information http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/BBH1998.html

thecivilwarparlor:

African American Nurses During The Civil War

During the Civil War, black women’s services included nursing or domestic chores in medical settings, laundering and cooking for the soldiers. As the Union Army marched through the South and large numbers of freed black men enlisted, their female family members often obtained employment with the unit. The Union Army paid black women to raise cotton on plantations for the northern government to sell.

Five black nurses served under the direction of Catholic nuns aboard the Navy hospital ship Red Rover. Four of their names—Alice Kennedy, Sarah Kinno, Ellen Campbell and Betsy Young—have been recorded. Black nurses are in the record books of both Union and Confederate hospitals. As many as 181 black nurses—both female and male—served in convalescent and US government hospitals in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina during the war.

Photo: Sixth-plate ambrotype of a Black woman in a white dress, with gilt accents to her earrings, necklace and rings. Solarization at margins only compromises image somewhat and the woman is still quite visible and distinct. Velvet lining rubbed, some dents to brass mat and gutta-percha case.  This image is from Railsplitter http://www.railsplitter.com/sale11/blackam.html

Source information http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/BBH1998.html



From the website: “The mission of the Cornell Hip Hop Collection (CHHC) is to collect and make accessible the historical artifacts of Hip Hop culture and to ensure their preservation for future generations. It is open to the public.”




Women skimming boiling cane juice to make sorghum syrup at a mill in Orange County, North Carolina. Sorghum plants originally came from Africa, where it grows on savanna land.


September 1939 
Marion Post Wolcott, photographer
Source: NY Public Library, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division

Women skimming boiling cane juice to make sorghum syrup at a mill in Orange County, North Carolina. Sorghum plants originally came from Africa, where it grows on savanna land.

September 1939 

Marion Post Wolcott, photographer

Source: NY Public Library, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division

(via heytoyourmamanem)



Hey to Your Mama N’em turned 4 today!

Shouts out to my Tumblr friends and followers for making the past 4 years great! xoxo

Hey to Your Mama N’em turned 4 today!

Shouts out to my Tumblr friends and followers for making the past 4 years great! xoxo






Young soldier reading on the running board of a salvage truck
St. Nazaire, France
ca. 1919
Library of Congress

The First World War began 100 years ago today, on July 28, 1914. When the United States entered the war in 1917, African Americans eagerly enlisted, trusting that the fight for freedom and democracy would extend them the same liberty. By the time World War I ended in November 1918, over 350,000 African American soldiers had served on the Western Front.

Young soldier reading on the running board of a salvage truck

St. Nazaire, France

ca. 1919

Library of Congress

The First World War began 100 years ago today, on July 28, 1914. When the United States entered the war in 1917, African Americans eagerly enlisted, trusting that the fight for freedom and democracy would extend them the same liberty. By the time World War I ended in November 1918, over 350,000 African American soldiers had served on the Western Front.

(Source: heytoyourmamanem)



This is fascinating.



Lithograph: Family record depicting African American family life before the Civil War and since the war.
Krebs Lithographing Company, Cincinnati, ca. 1880
Library of Congress

Lithograph: Family record depicting African American family life before the Civil War and since the war.

Krebs Lithographing Company, Cincinnati, ca. 1880

Library of Congress



blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

RIP, Alice Coachman, First Black Woman to Win an Olympic Gold Medal

(November 9, 1923-July 14, 2014)

Books:

Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman Olympic High Jump Champion

Heather Lang

At the 1948 Olympics in London, members of the U.S. Women’s Track and Field team went down to defeat one by one. Any hope of winning rested on Alice Coachman. Thousands of spectators stayed late for the high-jump event and witnessed history as she became the first African American woman to win an Olympic gold medal. In time for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, this book follows Coachman on her journey from rural Georgia, where she overcame adversity both as a woman and as a black athlete, to her triumph in Wembly Stadium.

Touch the Sky: Alice Coachman, Olympic High Jumper

Ann Malaspina

A biography of the first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal, from her childhood in segregated Albany, Georgia, in the 1930s, through her recognition at the 1996 Olympics as one of the hundred best athletes in Olympic history.







NPR has assembled a fantastic resource on the Civil Rights Act, which was enacted on July 2, 1964. Great information and photographs documenting this historic event.



Woman riding a float in the annual Bud Billiken Day Parade in Chicago, Illinois (August 1973). The Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic is the oldest and largest African American parade in the U.S. Founded in 1929 by Chicago Defender editor Robert Sengstacke, the parade’s original purpose was to give underprivileged youth a day in the limelight. The event is held every August on Chicago’s South Side.
This photograph was taken by John H. White, as part of the EPA’s Documerica project.
Source: the U.S. National Archives

Woman riding a float in the annual Bud Billiken Day Parade in Chicago, Illinois (August 1973). The Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic is the oldest and largest African American parade in the U.S. Founded in 1929 by Chicago Defender editor Robert Sengstacke, the parade’s original purpose was to give underprivileged youth a day in the limelight. The event is held every August on Chicago’s South Side.

This photograph was taken by John H. White, as part of the EPA’s Documerica project.

Source: the U.S. National Archives

(Source: Flickr / usnationalarchives)





Fannie Lou Hamer’s testimony before the Credentials Committee, Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey - August 22, 1964

via American Experience

(Source: youtube.com)